Panic Fest 2020 | Jan 24 - 30 2020 | KCMO

Saban Films Acquires Tate Murders Thriller ‘The Haunting of Sharon Tate’ Starring Hilary Duff

The Haunting of Sharon Tate
Credit: Saban Films

Saban Films announced that they have acquired U.S. distribution rights from Voltage Pictures to true-crime psychological thriller ‘The Haunting of Sharon Tate’ starring Hilary Duff (“Younger,” The Perfect Man), Jonathan Bennett (Mean Girls, Cheaper by the Dozen 2) and Lydia Hearst (Between Worlds, “South of Hell”). Daniel Farrands (Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers, The Haunting in Connecticut) wrote, directed and produced the film. Lucas Jarach and Eric Brenner also produced through Jim Jacobsen’s Skyline Entertainment banner, which also fully financed the film.

The film takes a look at the last days leading up to Tate’s murder from her point of view. The plot is inspired by an actual quote from Tate, from an interview published a year before her death, wherein she revealed having dreams about ghosts haunting her house and foreseeing her own death at the hands of a satanic cult.

“The Tate Murders remain a horrifying cultural fascination, even nearly 50 years after they occurred,” said Saban Films’ Bill Bromiley. “Hilary is mesmerizing as Sharon Tate; this is a brutal and unsettling story.”

Bill Bromiley and Jonathan Saba negotiated the deal for Saban Films, along with President and COO Jonathan Deckter for Voltage Pictures on behalf of filmmakers.

Most recently, Saban Films acquired James Marsh’s ‘King of Thieves’ starring Michael Caine, Jim Broadbent, Tom Courtenay and Michael Gambon. At the latest Toronto International Film Festival, the company acquired: ‘Richard Says Goodbye’, the Wayne Roberts-directed drama that stars Johnny Depp, and Sarah Daggar-Nickson’s ‘A Vigilante’ starring Olivia Wilde.


The Haunting of Sharon Tate
arrives in theaters & On Demand on April 5, 2019.

 

Haunting of Sharon Tate
Saban Films

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